Last week lawmakers in the state of Maine enlisted in the fight against federal tyranny and in defense of constitutional liberty. Specifically, the state legislature approved HP 1397, a measure addressed to the President of the United States and intended to remind him of the Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable searches and seizures, the Sixth Amendment’s guarantee of the right to counsel, and the age-old concepts of due process and habeas corpus.

A driver who crashed a vehicle on a Kabul runway near Leon Panetta's plane Wednesday may have been targeting the U.S. Defense Secretary in a car bomb attack, the Iranian Press TV reported. The Secretary was not injured and the alleged perpetrator has been arrested, the International Security Assistance Force in Kabul said.

The Obama administration and top former officials are reportedly violating federal law by offering support to the Iranian Mujahedin-e Khalq, a notorious Islamic-Communist terror group that has murdered senior American personnel and is officially designated a “foreign terrorist organization” by the U.S. State Department.

 

When Eric Holder said in a speech last week that the President has the authority to order the killing of U.S. citizens abroad, many wondered if the rationale offered by the Attorney General for targeting Americans for non-judicial killing would also apply within the borders of the United States. Testifying at a congressional hearing, FBI Director Robert Mueller said he did not know and would have to check with others at the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

Daniel Webster warned: "It is hardly too strong to say that the Constitution was made to guard the people against the dangers of good intentions. There are men in all ages who mean to govern well, but they mean to govern. They promise to be good masters, but they mean to be masters."
 

Earlier this week, lawmakers in Utah stood together and expressed their opposition to the indefinite detention provisions of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).  As reported earlier in The New American, on February 21, Utah State Senator Todd Weiler (R-Woods Cross) submitted SCR 11, a resolution calling for the Congress to “repeal or clarify Sections 1021 and 1022 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012.”
 
 

Just minutes ago as we write, the state Senate of Virginia passed HB 1160, the bill that would  prevent the use of any state agency or member of the Virginia National Guard or Virginia Defense Force to participate in the unlawful detention of a citizen of Virginia by the government of the United States Government in violation of the state and federal constitution.
 

The President of the United States has the authority to order the targeted killing of Americans living abroad whom he suspects of posing an extraordinary threat to the security of the homeland. This was the opinion delivered by Attorney General Eric Holder in a speech Monday at Northwestern Law School in Chicago.

 

According to the official version of events promulgated by the Obama administration, after U.S. forces killed Osama bin Laden, his body was flown to Afghanistan for identification and then buried in the Arabian Sea about 12 hours after his death, supposedly in keeping with Islamic ritual. However, internal e-mails from intelligence service Stratfor, obtained by the hacker group Anonymous and posted to the Internet by WikiLeaks, cast doubt on that story.

Students of history may recall the year 49 B.C. Early in that momentous year, a popular soldier-statesman crossed the Rubicon River, thus effectively declaring war on the citizens on the Republic whose acclaim had exalted him to the pinnacle of authority and strength. The details of the story are recounted by the historian Suetonius. Suetonius writes that upon approaching the banks of that historic boundary, Julius Caesar stood before his legion of faithful soldiers and uttered the now-famous phrase: alea iacta est ("the die has been cast"). With those three words, Caesar signaled the end of the Roman Republic. The rule of law soon was supplanted by the rule of one ambitious (audacious?) man.

 

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