As part of its ongoing covert war against Iran, the U.S. government has for years been providing training — some of it on American soil — and other material support to a State Department-designated “foreign terrorist organization,” the Mujahedeen-e-Khalq (MEK), the New Yorker’s Seymour M. Hersh reports.

 

On March 8 the state Senate of Virginia passed HB 1160, the bill that would  prevent the use of any state agency or member of the Virginia National Guard or Virginia Defense Force to participate in the unlawful detention of a citizen of Virginia by the U.S. government in violation of the state and federal constitution as set forth in the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

Late Monday, the United States State Department’s Rewards for Justice program posted on its website a bounty of $10 million for Hafiz Mohammad Saeed.  Saeed is wanted primarily for his alleged role in bombings in Mumbai on November 26, 2008, when explosions blasted through two hotels, a train station, and a Jewish Chabad house. The attacks resulted in the deaths of 166 people in South Mumbai.
 
 

While Washington's political leaders and much of the nation's news media have been calling attention to and raising alarm over Iran's nuclear program, the United States has been quietly making plans for nuclear-powered unmanned planes, according to the London Guardian newspaper.

 

The Obama administration wants Congress to grant it even broader authority and more funding to send U.S. troops on missions around the world dealing with everything from terror and narcotics to supporting national governments facing opposition and law enforcement operations, senior Defense Department officials told a Senate Armed Services Subcommittee. And lawmakers seemed happy to comply.

 

A Pakistani court convicted three of Osama bin Laden’s surviving wives and two of his daughters of being illegally present in the country. According to the sentences handed down on Monday, the five women will serve a 45-day prison sentence with credit for time served, after whch they will likely be deported.

If you are stopped for speeding or arrested for an unpaid fine, you may be subjected to a strip search and thorough inspection of even the most private body parts, the U.S. Supreme Court said Monday in another controversial 5-4 decision. Justice Anthony Kennedy sided with the court's conservative bloc and wrote the opinion of the court in Florence v. Board of Chosen Freeholders of County of Burlington, the case of Albert Florence, a New Jersey man apprehended in a motor vehicle stop and arrested for an allegedly unpaid fine. In fact, Florence had already paid the fine, but the bench warrant for his arrest had, "for some unexplained reason," not been removed from the statewide computer database at the time of the arrest, Kennedy said.

 

French police raided eight cities last Friday and collared 17 suspected terrorists, according to news reports. Among those captured in the raids on Lyon, Paris, Nice, Rouen, Le Mans, Nantes, Marseillie and Toulouse was Willie Brigitte, a terrorist convicted for his role in a plot to destroy the Lucas Heights nuclear research facility near Sydney, Australia.
 
 

Armed Islamist rebel groups in Syria supported by the Obama administration and Western governments seeking to oust “President” Bashir al-Assad are engaged in “ethnic cleansing” of Christians, according to news reports and human rights organizations. And as the conflict escalates, the persecution of the once-protected Christian minority is growing as well.

 

The journalists and activists challenging the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) in federal court may have moved the case against the due-process-denying law a little closer toward a final hearing on the merits of their complaint.

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