The official body count from the Norway terror attack was still changing even early this week. Some of the victims had not even been located yet — let alone buried.

But across the world, “experts,” journalists, politicians — just about everybody with an opinion, really — was already either on offense or defense. The media-driven witch-hunt began almost instantly.

Israel haters and Palestinian activists are trying to pin the killer on Israel. Anti-Christian zealots are screeching about the “dangers” of Christianity. Leftist political opportunists are working fiendishly to link the terror to right-of-center parties and activists across Europe. And critics of Freemasonry are hyping his membership in Oslo’s Masonic lodge.

After a deluge of news reports pinning the Norway terror attacks on Muslim extremists — who originally took the credit and celebrated the tragedy —  it emerged that the admitted perpetrator in police custody was in fact a 32-year-old native Norwegian named Anders Behring Breivik.

Suddenly, the narrative morphed. An early statement by police and a suspicious Facebook profile suggested the shooter was a “Christian,” a Freemason, and a “right-wing extremist” of some variety. Since then information has continued to surface — including a 1,500-page “manifesto” and a short video attributed to Breivik.

Norwegian authorities have captured the man suspected of Friday’s bombing in Oslo and shooting at Utoya island, which left 91 people dead. The suspect is Anders Behrin Breivik, 32, whom Norwegian authorities describe as a Christian fundamentalist.

Breivik’s attack on Friday began with a bomb in the capital’s government headquarters, which houses the Prime Minister’s office. Seven people are believed dead in that attack. But Breivik, apparently, was waiting to do murder at the Island, which is about 20 miles from Oslo. There, he gunned down 84.

Said Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg, "My childhood paradise ... yesterday was transformed into Hell."

The head of the legal defense team representing the man suspected of carrying out a deadly shooting spree in November 2009 at Ft. Hood, Texas, has taken a “leave of absence” from the case.

John Galligan, a former Army colonel, did not appear with Major Nidal Hasan at Hasan’s arraignment on Wednesday in Ft. Hood. In fact, the accused informed the court that he would now prefer to be represented by military lawyers from the Judge Advocate General corps.

Given the phrasing of Hasan’s statement and attorney Galligan’s own words in a letter explaining his departure, it is unclear whether Galligan was fired by Hasan or whether his stepping down was the result of a mutually agreed upon change in the relationship. Galligan’s letter reads as follows:

Robert Redford and Shia LeBeouf will be starring in a film that glorifies members of the Weather Underground, portraying those terrorists as true American heroes.

Entitled The Company You Keep, the film is based on the Neil Gordon novel of the same name, about the domestic terrorist group the Weather Underground. The film focuses on a 30-year-long FBI manhunt for a Weather Underground terrorist, played by Robert Redford, who has been forced to go into hiding after his identity was revealed by an overly ambitious reporter, played by Shia LeBeouf.

Publishers Weekly provides this synopsis of the novel:

On June 23 the United States conducted an unmanned aerial drone attack in Somalia, killing at least one person and wounding others. The targets of the attack were members of the Somali militant group al-Shabaab, which for several years has been fighting the U.S.-backed Somali government. Recently, however, the group began “planning operations outside of Somalia,” a senior U.S. military official told the Washington Post.

“A Pentagon official said … that one of the militants who was wounded had been in contact with Anwar al-Awlaki, the American-born radical cleric now hiding in Yemen,” according to the New York Times. Awlaki himself was the target of a U.S. drone strike in May but escaped unharmed.

Taliban forces are reportedly taking credit for the assassination of Ahmad Wali Karzai, Afghan President Hamid Karzai’s half-brother, who was shot in the head by the long-time chief of his own security detail on July 12.

Police are still investigating and said an internal dispute, not politics, could have been the motive. The BBC suggested rival criminals could have been to blame. But the Taliban resistance sent a message to Al Jazeera boasting of their role in the murder and warning all government officials to resign or be killed - anywhere at any time.  

Ahmad was an extraordinarily influential figure in Afghan politics, especially in the volatile Southern region.

JBS CEO Art Thompson's topics this week — The EPA Plays Punch and Judy with the American People; and Obama administration reaches out to militant Islam.

While other Transportation Security Administration employees were sticking their hands in other people’s pants, one of them was sticking other people’s property in his own pants, according to the Broward County, Florida, Sheriff’s office. Police report that 30-year-old Nelson Santiago, a TSA screener at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, was spotted stuffing an iPad from a passenger’s luggage into his pants. Under questioning, they say, he admitted to having stolen “computers, GPS devices, and video cameras from luggage he was screening” over the past six months, according to Miami/Fort Lauderdale TV station WPLG. Detectives estimate that Santiago expropriated over $50,000 worth of electronics.

Although the TSA, like most bureaucracies, is not known for its speed, police say Santiago proved to be a very fast worker indeed where his personal profit was concerned, taking photos of the stolen items with his cellphone and posting them online, where they would often sell even before his shift had ended.
 

The John Birch Society Chief Executive Officer Art Thompson reveals the intentions, networks, major players in the Triangle of Terror.
 

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