Monday’s meeting of the European Union in Brussels resulted in agreement of 25 of the 27 member states to inflict upon themselves and their hapless and increasingly powerless citizenry the tools of international fiscal dictatorship.

 

Greece’s Finance Minister, Evangelos Venizelos, rejected the German idea of imposing a eurozone “overseer” as part of the agreement to keep bailout funds flowing to his country.

 

Here's the latest "Freedom Index: A Congressional Scorecard Based on the Constitution."

Top Masonic leaders met with the heads of European Union institutions to discuss spreading “democracy” and human rights in Europe and throughout the EU’s so-called “neighborhood,” according to a press release issued by the Brussels-based emerging continental government. Critics of the supranational regime, meanwhile, pointed out the irony of unelected regional rulers discussing democracy — especially after the EU-backed overthrow of democratically elected leaders in Italy and Greece in recent weeks.

The November 30 meeting, "A partnership for democracy and shared prosperity: a common willingness to promote democratic rights and liberties," was hosted by EU Commission President José Manuel Barroso, a former underground Maoist leader in Portugal before adopting a more moderate stance and entering the political world. Among the EU officials in attendance at the gathering were European Parliament President Jerzy Buzek and EU Council President Herman Van Rompuy.

"Building a future based on democracy, pluralism, the rule of law, human rights and social justice is a task and ambition of the European Union, and much still remains to be done, not only in the neighborhood of the European Union, but in our own countries, too,” Commission President Barroso said in a statement. “I am glad to see that participants share a deep concern for the promotion of those values which are and have to remain at the core of the European project."

Leaders of Latin American and Caribbean governments gathered in Caracas, Venezuela, on Friday and Saturday to forge a new regional organization that includes representatives from every country in the Western Hemisphere except the United States and Canada. According to socialist rulers backing the new scheme, it is aimed at providing a counterweight to U.S. “imperialism” in the region while promoting “integration.” The communist regime ruling mainland China celebrated the news and vowed to support the group.

The budding 33-member alliance — dubbed CELAC, the Spanish initials for “Community of Latin American and Caribbean States” — is reportedly the brainchild of Venezuelan socialist strongman Hugo Chavez. Former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who founded the shadowy but immensely powerful socialist cabal known as “Foro de Sao Paulo” with dictator Fidel Castro and the Sandinistas, also played a key role.

CELAC represents the most recent integration scheme in a region already plagued by a costly patchwork of expensive intergovernmental alliances, including the relatively new Union of South American Nations (UNASUR), the socialist Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our Americas (ALBA), Mercosur, the Caribbean Community, and many more. Among the most prominent is the largely U.S.-funded Organization of American States (OAS), which includes every nation in the hemisphere except Cuba.

Last Friday, the leaders of the former Soviet republics of Russia, Belarus, and Kazakhstan entered into an accord strengthening the economic integration of their three nations, a step they intend to accelerate their permanent union. The plan to create the new entity -— the Eurasian Union -— was first announced in a speech delivered by on-again, off-again ruler of Russia, Vladimir Putin.

It was in the Kremlin that the three presidents gathered to commit their countries to the policy of surrendering aspects of their individual sovereignty. The plan is called the “Declaration on Eurasian Economic Integration.” Russian President Dmitri A. Medvedev was quoted in the New York Times calling the project “a new and very powerful step on the path to forming a Eurasian Economic Union.”
 
While Vladimir Putin is credited with hatching the idea last month, the broad strokes of the U.S.S.R-lite were painted years ago. In fact, the current president of Kazakhstan, Nursultan Nazarbayev, floated the idea in the 1990s as a solution to the economic problem plaguing many of the former satellites of the Soviet Union.

At an APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation) summit last weekend in Hawaii, President Barack Obama told CNSNews that the United States needs to step up its courtship of foreign dollars. He said America has been “a little bit lazy” in promoting itself to overseas investors.

He added, “It’s important to remember that the United States is still the largest recipient of foreign investment in the world, and there are a lot of things that make foreign investors see the U.S. as a great opportunity — our stability, our openness, our innovative free market culture.”

But the concepts of stability and free markets have taken a hit during his administration, and not because free markets don’t work. A real unemployment rate of what critics say is closer to 20 percent than nine, a downgrade of the United States' debt rating, and a huge national debt don’t reflect stability. How does Obama propose to promote this climate as stable, open, and innovative?

“One of the things that my administration has done is set up something called SelectUSA that organizes all the government agencies to work with state and local governments where they’re seeking assistance from us to go out there and make it easier for foreign investors to build a plant in the United States, and put outstanding U.S. workers back to work in the United States of America,” he told CEOs and others at the summit.

Using “financial stability” as justification, the European Union is quietly plotting to foist a massive, perpetual bailout machine on euro-zone members that critics say represents a “dictatorship” and a “treaty of debt.” But opposition to the scheme is growing quickly. 

The initial “authorized capital stock” for the so-called European Stability Mechanism (ESM) will be close to $1 trillion. But it can be expanded at any time by the regime in charge of the institution, which will operate completely above national governments and laws.  

“ESM Members hereby irrevocably and unconditionally undertake to provide their contribution to the authorized capital stock,” notes the draft treaty posted on EU Council’s website. “They shall meet all capital calls on a timely basis in accordance with the terms set out in this Treaty.”

If the initial trillion proves to be insufficient — and considering the debt-laden governments ruling Italy, Spain, Portugal, Greece, Ireland, and other nations, it almost certainly will not be enough — the ESM’s Board of Governors can simply demand more. And national governments must hand over the money, no questions asked, within seven days. 

President Obama will host this year's North American Leaders' Summit

The Obama administration is pushing to leave more troops in the Persian Gulf and to create a regional equivalent of NATO in the Arabic Middle East, according to the New York Times.

"After unsuccessfully pressing both the Obama administration and the Iraqi government to permit as many as 20,000 American troops to remain in Iraq beyond 2011, the Pentagon is now drawing up an alternative," the New York Times reported October 30. Part of that plan may be to leave additional troops in Kuwait, for years a staging area for the Iraq war, or simply to float a larger naval fleet in the Persian Gulf.

But the Obama administration has another alternative they are floating to create "security" in the Islamic world, the New York Times reported: "The administration and the military are trying to foster a new 'security architecture' for the Persian Gulf that would integrate air and naval patrols and missile defense."

That "security architecture" may include boosting existing security alliances in the Arab world, especially the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), a 30-year-old group of six Persian Gulf dictatorships led by Saudi Arabia. The GCC is both a NATO and European Common Market-style organization with a customs union agreement that was inked in 2003. The GCC's six nations on the Arabian peninsula together have one trillion dollars in GDP, and the GCC is considering membership requests from Jordan and Morocco. "Another part of the administration’s post-Iraq planning involves the Gulf Cooperation Council, dominated by Saudi Arabia," the New York Times reported. "It has increasingly sought to exert its diplomatic and military influence in the region and beyond. Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, for example, sent combat aircraft to the Mediterranean as part of the NATO-led intervention in Libya, while Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates each have forces in Afghanistan."

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