CIA Wants to Deploy More Drones in Yemen

By:  Joe Wolverton, II
04/23/2012
       
CIA Wants to Deploy More Drones in Yemen

The CIA wants permission to deploy drones to seek and destroy suspected terrorists regardless of the potential for collateral damage (read: innocent people who might be in the kill zone).

The CIA wants permission to deploy drones to seek and destroy suspected terrorists regardless of the potential for collateral damage (read: innocent people who might be in the kill zone).

 

That’s the story being told by “U.S. officials” as quoted by the Washington Post.  If the spy agency cum hit squad gets its way, the drones would be used to carry out “signature strikes” that green light attacks on targets based on nothing more than “patterns of suspicious behavior.”
 
For the record, this missile-attracting intelligence includes “militants gathering at known al-Qaeda compounds or unloading explosives.” Given that roughly 60 percent of the U.S. Senate and 37 percent of the House of Representatives are lawyers, one would think that they would hold the intelligence agency petitioners to a higher standard of specificity. Who, one would rightly ask, is to determine “militant” status, much less how many of them together constitutes a “gathering?”
 
Americans who understand that our entire jurisprudential system is based on the concept of “notice” will appreciate the fundamental flaw in a series of statutes (e.g., the National Defense Authorization Act) or guidelines that codify giant swaths of gray area that the administration can then use as legal cover for Predator attackes or a platoon of presidentially deployed troops sent to neutralize a suspected threat to the homeland.
 
With regard to the very fundamental role played by notice in the law, the U.S. Supreme Court has held that notice must be "reasonably calculated, under all the circumstances, to apprise interested parties of the pendency of the action and afford them an opportunity to present their objections." A Hellfire missile fired from a Predator by a faceless pilot sitting in Langley hardly seems to cross that legal threshold.
 
Click here to read the entire article.
 
Photo of U.S. predator drone: AP Images

 

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