The Enemy Expatriation Act and the NDAA: Due Process Destroyed?

By:  Joe Wolverton, II
01/25/2012
       
The Enemy Expatriation Act and the NDAA: Due Process Destroyed?

As has been reported here since the bill was first proposed, of all the evils perpetrated by the National Defense Authorization Act, one of the most sinister is the denial of the due process of law to all those detained under its provisions.
 

As has been reported here since the bill was first proposed, of all the evils perpetrated by the National Defense Authorization Act, one of the most sinister is the denial of the due process of law to all those detained under its provisions.

Section 1021 is unqualifiedly the most pernicious piece of legislation in many years, moving the Constitution and our Republic closer to despotism than any other paragraph imaginably could.
 
In a nutshell, Section 1021 permits the President of the United States to order the U.S. military to arrest and detain any American citizen suspected by him of posing a military threat to national security.
 
These alleged belligerents may then be detained in a federal facility until the cessation of hostilities (that is to say, indefinitely) without recourse to an attorney and without being informed as to the charges being leveled against them (in hostile violation of the habeas corpus protection of the Constitution).
 
After performing the prerequisite pas de deux of defense of the Constitution and expansion of his own already-dictatorial power, President Obama withdrew his initial promise of veto and signed this rights-shredding act into law on December 31, 2011.

Click here to read the entire article.

Photo of prisoner: AP Images

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