The Pursuit of Whistleblowers Continues as Judge Denies Informant's Motion

By:  Joe Wolverton, II
08/13/2012
       
The Pursuit of Whistleblowers Continues as Judge Denies Informant's Motion

On August 8, U.S. District Court Judge Leonie Brinkema denied a CIA whistleblower’s motion to dismiss for vagueness and overbreadth charges brought against him by the Obama administration charging him with disclosing to journalists the identities of CIA agents he alleges were involved in interrogating suspected “terrorists.”

 On August 8, U.S. District Court Judge Leonie Brinkema denied a CIA whistleblower’s motion to dismiss for vagueness and overbreadth charges brought against him by the Obama administration, charging him with disclosing to journalists the identities of CIA agents he alleges were involved in interrogating suspected “terrorists.”

John Kiriakou (pictured) was an agent with the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) who was indicted earlier this year by a federal grand jury for disclosing to reporters the name of another CIA asset who was tasked with interrogating alleged al-Qaeda financier Abu Zybaydah.

The indictment included one charge of making false statements, which carries a maximum five-year prison sentence, and four counts of violating federal law, including the Espionage Act — an offense punishable by up to 10 years in a federal prison.

There is little wonder why the Obama administration would seek to silence Kiriakou: In 2007, Kiriakou told ABC News that he considered waterboarding an “unnecessary” form of interrogation.

In her order, Judge Brinkema ruled against Kiriakou, holding that the relevant sections of the Espionage Act and the Intelligence Identities Protection Act (IIPA) were not overly vague or overly broad and thus the charges against Kiriakou would stand.

In their motion, Kiriakou's attorneys argued that several key terms in the statutes their client was charged with violating were not sufficiently clear and precise so as to afford him adequate notice of what aspect of his conduct was illegal and that “the problem of pervasive over-classification of information also rendered the Espionage Act provisions unfair to apply.”

The judge disagreed.

Click here to read the entire article.

Photo of John Kiriakou: AP Images

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