U.S. Funded Anti-Morsi Activists, Terrorist Advocacy With Foreign Aid

By:  Thomas R. Eddlem
07/11/2013
       
U.S. Funded Anti-Morsi Activists, Terrorist Advocacy With Foreign Aid

U.S. foreign aid dollars have been channeled to U.S.-based radicals advocating terrorism against Egyptian civilians, according to a recent report by Emad Mekay of the U.C.-Berkley Investigative Reporting Program, along with funding for other opponents of the former President Mohammad Morsi.

U.S. foreign aid dollars have been channeled to a U.S.-based radical advocating terrorism against Egyptian civilians, according to a July 10 report by Emad Mekay of the U.C.-Berkeley Investigative Reporting Program, along with funding for other opponents of the former Egyptian President Mohammad Morsi.

One recipient of U.S. “democracy” aid, former Egyptian police Colonel and Supreme Court Justice Omar Afifi Soliman, posted the following advice to opponents of Morsi on this Facebook page, according to Mekay's report published on Al Jazeera-English:

"Make a road bump with a broken palm tree to stop the buses going into Cairo, and drench the road around it with gas and diesel. When the bus slows down for the bump, set it all ablaze so it will burn down with all the passengers inside.… God bless," Soliman's Facebook post last month read. In late May he instructed, "Behead those who control power, water and gas utilities."

All posts on Soliman's Facebook page from the past year have been removed since publication of Mekay's report. Mekay noted in his investigative exposé that Soliman has been on the federal payroll since 2009, and continues to receive taxpayer funding:

In an interview with the Investigative Reporting Program at UC Berkeley, Soliman reluctantly admitted he received US government funding from the National Endowment for Democracy, but complained it wasn't enough. "It is like $2000 or $2,500 a month," he said. "Do you think this is too much? Obama wants to give us peanuts. We will not accept that."

Establishment officials engaging in damage control for the Egyptian and “democracy” foreign aid programs have tried to minimize Soliman's role in the U.S. foreign aid program — notwithstanding the fact that the former police colonel and Supreme Court judge served as a panelist at a 2011 Carnegie Endowment forum called "Egypt's Transition and the Challenge of Security Sector Reform." (The Carnegie Endowment is one of the most influential and politically connected establishment organizations.) “U.S. money ends up in the hands of all sides (especially the military), so to depict the protests and overthrow of Morsi as some sort of U.S.-funded plot is inaccurate and irresponsible,” Anand Gopal of  the New America Foundation told the DailyCaller.com in defense of the U.S. foreign aid program.

Click here to read the entire article.

Photo of a wounded Egyptian: AP Images

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