Conspiracies Old and New

By:  Sam Blumenfeld
12/16/2011
       
Conspiracies Old and New

Antony Sutton, in his remarkable expose of Skull and Bones, the secret senior society at Yale, wrote that a conspiracy, to be considered as such, must be comprised of three facets: “There must be secret meetings of the participants and efforts made to conceal their joint actions; those meetings must jointly agree to take a course of action; and this action must be illegal.” He then went on to use his skills as an historian, scientific researcher, and detective to reveal that the Skull and Bones society at Yale University was and is indeed a conspiracy.

 

Antony Sutton, in his remarkable expose of Skull and Bones, the secret senior society at Yale, wrote that a conspiracy, to be considered as such, must be comprised of three facets: “There must be secret meetings of the participants and efforts made to conceal their joint actions; those meetings must jointly agree to take a course of action; and this action must be illegal.” He then went on to use his skills as an historian, scientific researcher, and detective to reveal that the Skull and Bones society at Yale University was and is indeed a conspiracy.

Sutton then went on to write one of the most incredible books on American history ever written, America’s Secret Establishment, published in 1986. He summed up its intent by stating: “What has to be proven in any conspiracy explanation of history is that the participants have secret groupings, and meet to plan illegal actions.”

He then used the scientific method to prove the existence of this conspiracy. First he posited a hypothesis, or theory, that the conspiracy exists. He then explained further:

We also intend to use two other principles of scientific research ignored by official establishment historians.

Firstly, in science the simplest explanation to a problem is always the most acceptable solution. By contrast, in establishment history, a simple answer is usually criticized as “simplistic.”. . .

Secondly, again in science, an answer that fits the most cases, i.e., the most general answer is also the most acceptable answer. For example, you have 12 events to explain and a theory that fits 11 of these events. That theory is more acceptable than a theory that fits only 4 or 5 of the events.

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Sam Blumenfeld (photo)

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