Kentucky Company Attacked for Declining Business of Homosexual Group

By:  Dave Bohon
04/02/2012
       
Kentucky Company Attacked for Declining Business of Homosexual Group

A T-shirt company in Lexington, Kentucky, is facing the wrath of a local homosexual activist contingent after the business politely passed on producing T-shirts for the city’s “gay pride” festival. On March 26, Lexington’s Gay and Lesbian Services Organization (GLSO) filed a discrimination complaint against the family-owned company, Hands On Originals, alleging that the firm had bid on producing the shirts, but when it was selected its owners changed their minds, explaining that their Christian values made them unable to fill the order for the “gay”-themed apparel.

 

A T-shirt company in Lexington, Kentucky, is facing the wrath of a local homosexual activist contingent after the business politely passed on producing T-shirts for the city’s “gay pride” festival. On March 26, Lexington’s Gay and Lesbian Services Organization (GLSO) filed a discrimination complaint against the family-owned company, Hands On Originals, alleging that the firm had bid on producing the shirts, but when it was selected its owners changed their minds, explaining that their Christian values made them unable to fill the order for the “gay”-themed apparel.

“This wouldn’t be acceptable to do to a black group,” Paul Brown, chairman of Lexington’s Pride Festival, told the community’s local NBC news affiliate. “This wouldn’t be acceptable to do to a Jewish group, and because of the fairness ordinance it’s unacceptable to do it to a gay group.”
 
The official discrimination complaint filed with the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Human Rights Commission reads: “On or about March 8, 2012, members of the GLSO were told that our Pride Festival t-shirt printing quote would not be honored due to the fact that the t-shirt company is a Christian organization. We were told that our t-shirts would not be printed. We believe that we have been discriminated against in violation of Local Ordinance 201-99, based on sexual orientation.”
 
Kent Ostrander (photo), executive director of the Family Foundation of Kentucky, explained that the owners of Hands On Originals were not immediately aware that they were bidding on a project that violated their values. What they told the homosexual group “in a very kind way was, ‘This is against our conscience. We don’t want to be a part of the gay-pride parade.’” Ostrander added that the business owners had located another T-shirt business that would honor their low quote, so no one was harmed.

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