Obama’s Wall Street Donors Turn to Mitt Romney

By:  Brian Koenig
10/03/2011
       
Obama’s Wall Street Donors Turn to Mitt Romney

As the 2012 presidential race surges forward, President Obama’s past Wall Street financiers are abandoning him and steadily migrating to the Right, pursuing candidates more supportive of the financial sector and a leader who is more apt to rekindle the country’s economic spirit. One GOP candidate who many financial moguls are tracking is former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney.

Obama raised a record-breaking $745 million during the 2008 election — more than twice what Republican rival John McCain raised — with some of his top campaign dollars streaming from prominent leaders in the financial industry, including Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, and Morgan Stanley. But Obama’s 2012 campaign efforts have hit a lull, as his fundraising appeals are being met with more resistance and less enthusiasm.

In mid-September the President blasted an e-mail to his reelection mailing list, with the subject line reading, "Sometime soon, can we meet for dinner?" The body of the e-mail read, "Today, I want to ask if you’ll join me and three other supporters for a meal and conversation sometime soon." "Please donate $5 or more to be automatically entered for a chance to join me for dinner."

As the 2012 presidential race surges forward, President Obama’s past Wall Street financiers are abandoning him and steadily migrating to the Right, pursuing candidates more supportive of the financial sector and a leader who is more apt to rekindle the country’s economic spirit. One GOP candidate who many financial moguls are tracking is former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney.

Obama raised a record-breaking $745 million during the 2008 election — more than twice what Republican rival John McCain raised — with some of his top campaign dollars streaming from prominent leaders in the financial industry, including Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, and Morgan Stanley. But Obama’s 2012 campaign efforts have hit a lull, as his fundraising appeals are being met with more resistance and less enthusiasm.

In mid-September the President blasted an e-mail to his reelection mailing list, with the subject line reading, "Sometime soon, can we meet for dinner?" The body of the e-mail read, "Today, I want to ask if you’ll join me and three other supporters for a meal and conversation sometime soon." "Please donate $5 or more to be automatically entered for a chance to join me for dinner."

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Photo of JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon: AP Images

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