Romney's "Not Getting Rid of All of" ObamaCare

By:  Jack Kenny
09/10/2012
       
Romney's "Not Getting Rid of All of" ObamaCare

 Mitt Romney has promised to "repeal and replace ObamaCare," but he is not for "getting rid of all" of the president's signature healthcare reform. And if he gets to preserve all the features of the Affordable Care Act that he likes, there may not be much replacing to do. In an interview on NBC's Meet the Press September 9, Romney said people with pre-existing conditions and adults under age 26 would not lose their guarantee of coverage if he succeeds in getting the Democrats' healthcare law repealed.

Mitt Romney has promised to "repeal and replace ObamaCare," but he is not for "getting rid of all" of the president's signature healthcare reform. And if he gets to preserve all the features of the Affordable Care Act that he likes, there may not be much replacing to do.

In an interview on NBC's Meet the Press September 9, Romney said people with pre-existing conditions and adults under age 26 would not lose their guarantee of coverage if he succeeds in getting the Democrats' healthcare law repealed.

"Well, of course not," Romney said. "I say we're going to replace Obamacare. And I'm replacing it with my own plan. And, you know, even in Massachusetts where I was governor, our plan there deals with pre-existing conditions and with young people." The Affordable Care Act requires that young adults will be eligible for coverage under their parents' healthcare plans until age 26.

"So you'd keep that part of the federal plan?" host David Gregory asked.

"Well, I'm not getting rid of all of healthcare reform," the Republican candidate replied. "Of course, there are a number of things that I like in healthcare reform that I'm going to put in place. One is to make sure that those with pre-existing conditions can get coverage. Two is to assure that the marketplace allows for individuals to have policies that cover their — their family up to whatever age they might like. I also want individuals to be able to buy insurance, health insurance, on their own as opposed to only being able to get it on a tax advantage basis through their company."

Romney was neither asked about nor did he mention the most controversial feature of the healthcare law, the requirement that people not otherwise covered either purchase health insurance or pay a penalty for not doing so. The healthcare reform that Romney championed and signed into law in Massachusetts included the same requirement, though the former governor has said he opposes the individual mandate at the federal level.

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Photo of Mitt Romney: AP Images

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