Senate and House Working on Resolving Differences in NDAA

By:  Joe Wolverton, II, J.D.
12/12/2012
       
Senate and House Working on Resolving Differences in NDAA

The fox has been put in charge of guarding the hen house.  Senator Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.) — author of the Enemy Expatriation Act — is leading the group of senators and congressmen working on a conference report of the Fiscal Year 2013 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

The fox has been put in charge of guarding the hen house.

Senator Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.) — author of the Enemy Expatriation Act — is leading the group of senators and congressmen working on the conference report (final version) of the Fiscal Year 2013 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

Last week, the Senate unanimously approved S. 3254, their version of the 2013 defense spending bill.

In May, the House, 299-120 passed H.R. 4310, the companion bill on that side of the Capitol.

Now, Lieberman will lead a crew of congressman in hammering out a compromise bill that can pass both houses and be presented to the president for his signature.

Lieberman isn’t the only fox put on patrol of the hens, however. He is joined on the conference committee by fellow senatorial warmongers John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.).

The practical effect of putting this claque in charge of the conference report means that Americans are all but guaranteed to still be considered potential suspects who could potentially be apprehended and potentially detained indefinitely under the bill's provisions.

On the Senate side, not a single senator said a single word against the unconstitutional and unconscionable power given to the president in the NDAA to deploy U.S. armed forces to nab and detain American citizens living in the the United States based on nothing more substantial than his own suspicion that the detainee poses a threat to national security.

In fairness, Senators Mike Lee (R-Utah) and Rand Paul (R-Ky.) introduced and managed to get passed an amendment to the Senate version of the NDAA that guaranteed the right to trial for any citizen or permanent resident of the United States imprisoned under the authority of the NDAA.

This proposal was met with significant criticism, however, by many writers and observers in the liberty movement.

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