Voting Index

Freedom Index: A Congressional Scorecard Based on the U.S. Constitution.
This voting index is currently published twice a year in The New American magazine. Each index scores all 535 members of Congress on 10 key votes on a scale of 0% to 100%. The more the Representatives and Senators adhere to the Constitution in their votes, the higher their scores on this index.

Feds Sue Telecom for Fighting Warrantless Search

By:  Michael Tennant
07/23/2012
       
Feds Sue Telecom for Fighting Warrantless Search

The Justice Department is suing a telecommunications company for challenging a request from the Federal Bureau of Investigation for customer information — despite the fact that the law authorizing the request explicitly permits such challenges.

The Justice Department is suing a telecommunications company for challenging a request from the Federal Bureau of Investigation for customer information — despite the fact that the law authorizing the request explicitly permits such challenges.

According to documents provided by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), which is representing the telecom, the company (whose name is one of the many redacted details in the documents) received a national security letter (NSL) in 2011. An NSL is essentially a self-issued search warrant whereby the FBI bypasses the Fourth Amendment and demands information about an individual without bothering to obtain a judge’s consent — and forces the recipient of the letter to keep mum about it because disclosure would allegedly harm national security. NSLs were employed somewhat sparingly prior to 2001 but became widely used — and abused, as the Justice Department’s inspector general reported in 2007 — after the misnamed Patriot Act loosened the requirements for issuing them.

The telecom chose to fight not just the gag order, as a handful of other companies have done, but also the NSL and the law authorizing it. This, EFF says, is allowed under a 2006 amendment to the law, which gives a company receiving an NSL the right to oppose the gag order and force the FBI to prove in court that disclosure of the NSL would harm national security. “Since Feb. 2009,” writes Wired, “NSLs must include express notification to recipients that they have a right to challenge the built-in gag order that prevents them from disclosing to anyone that the government is seeking customer records.”

Click here to read the entire article.

Photo: telecommunications towers into the clouds via Shutterstock

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